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A photo of a dock on Isle of Wight with boats

Isle of Wight

We've been working with local communities, businesses and authorities to reduce the use of storm overflows on the Isle of Wight.

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The challenge

The Isle of Wight Pathfinder is made up of eight sub-catchments. Sandown Waste Treatment Works handles more than 90% of the wastewater treatment for the island. Almost all the sewers serving towns on the Isle of Wight are combined, meaning that rainwater and foul water both enter the same network. After periods of heavy rainfall, the extra rainwater can overwhelm the system, leading to the use of storm overflows. In 2020, Sandown had the largest number of storm overflow releases.

Due to the mix of catchments within one defined area, this offered us a great opportunity to trial different solutions to slow the amount of rainwater entering the sewers.

To do this, we’re building strong relationships with local partners and are committed to delivering interventions that will overcome these surface water challenges.

 

 

 

What we're doing

1

Improving our sites

We're upgrading and optimising some of our sites to improve their efficiency. This includes increased storm capacity at Appley and new pumps at two pumping stations to. These investments will help manage water flow.

2

Removing misconnections

We've found and are removing large numbers of misconnections from our network. This is where surface water run-off is accidentally connected to the foul sewer, which puts extra pressure on the system.

3

Managing large roofs

Buildings with large roofs lead to lots of surface water run-off. To help slow the amount of surface water entering the foul sewer, we've worked with businesses, schools and communities to help manage the run-off, such as with rain gardens and planters.

4

Managing highways

Highways are responsible for a lot of surface water entering the foul sewers. We're working with local authorities to reduce this flow. This includes implementing sustainable drainage systems such as tree pits, rain gardens and pocket basins.

5

Water butts

Slow-draining water butts help to slow the amount of water entering the sewer network while giving people a store of rainwater that they can use around their gardens and green spaces. We offered slow-drain water butts to 1,000 homes in Gurnard/Cowes as well as all properties in Havenstreet.

Results

Our Pathfinder project in the Sandown catchment is due to be completed by 2025. Southern Water is working closely with the Isle of Wight Council and the Environment Agency to identify further opportunities, including green high streets and improving network efficiency. You can view the full reports using the links below.

70%

Our work in Havenstreet reduced storm overflows in the area by 70%. You can read the full case study using the link below.

3,000

We’ve installed over 3,000 slow-drain water butts on the Isle of Wight so far.

Simple icon of a plant in a pot

43

Across our region, we've installed rain garden planters at 43 schools, with another 50 planned.

Results

Our Pathfinder project in the Sandown catchment is due to be completed by 2025. Southern Water is working closely with the Isle of Wight Council and the Environment Agency to identify further opportunities, including green high streets and improving network efficiency. You can view the full reports using the links below.

70%

Our work in Havenstreet reduced storm overflows in the area by 70%. You can read the full case study using the link below.

3,000

We’ve installed over 3,000 slow-drain water butts on the Isle of Wight so far.

Simple icon of a plant in a pot

43

Across our region, we've installed rain garden planters at 43 schools, with another 50 planned.

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